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  1. Introduction 1 item
    1.  

      Spring 2019

       

      Buildings are good to think with. This course will explore anthropological approaches to the study of architectural forms.  It will focus primarily on the significance of domestic space and public private boundaries, gender and the body, the materiality of architectural form and materials and the study of architectural representations.  The course will be structured chronologically and thematically beginning with early anthropological encounters with built forms and the philosophical, historical and social context of these approaches up to the present day within anthropology. 

       

      This course is open to second and third years who have attended at least Anth 1001:  Introduction to Material Culture or C80.   It will be assessed by one 4,000 word (max.) essay worth 100 percent of the overall grade.  The essay is due the first day of the following term.  The Essay will be on a subject of the students choosing in consultation with the course instructor.  Incidents of plagiarism and self plagiarism will be pursued according to UCL policy. If you are uncertain as to the criteria and penalties please consult the departmental guidelines.

       

      It is mandatory to attend lectures/tutorials.  In addition, undergraduate students will be required to summarize and present at least one of the required week's readings to their undergraduate tutorial group. Participation is mandatory and on condition of handing in an AQCI of one of the week's required readings to the instructor, at the beginning of the tutorial session. Please use the AQCI format below

       

      Electronic Coursework Submission 

       

      Once you are enrolled on a course within the Department of Anthropology, you will automatically be enrolled on its corresponding module on AnthroMoodle, which can be accessed via the internet on campus or from home. The course code and name are the same as the ones on top of your reading list. Go to http://moodle.ucl.ac.uk and use your user-id and password to access the course (note that this address contains no 'www'). On the course page simply follow the link for electronic submission to submit your work. The deadline for submission is the same for both, the printed and the electronic copy. If you have problems accessing moodle please contact anthmoodle-admin@ucl.ac.uk

       

  2. ARGUMENT, QUESTION, CONNECTIONS AND IMPLICATIONS: AQCI 1 item
    1. Create a one page document following the AQCI format for each individual reading to help structure your notes.

       

       

      1. CENTRAL QUOTATION.  Quote a sentence (or excerpts from linked sentences) from the text (or texts) that you think is central to the author's (or author's) implicit or explicit argument(s).  Always cite the page.

       

      2. ARGUMENT.  In no more than three sentences, state the author's explicit or implicit argument.  Be sure to include both: what the author is arguing for, and what they are arguing against.

       

      3. QUESTION.  Raise a question which you think is not fully, or satisfactorily, answered by the text.  The question should be one of interpretation, or of inquiry, not simply a question of fact.

       

      4. EXPERIENTIAL CONNECTION.    Say in a few lines only, how the argument confirms or contradicts your own experience or common sense.

       

      5. TEXTUAL CONNECTION.  Connect the argument of this text to an argument or point you find in another reading assignment we have done in this course or you have picked up from earlier study at UCL.  Present a quote from the other text (citing it properly), and explain how the present text's argument contrasts with, confirms, clarifies, or elaborates the other text's argument or point.

       

      6. IMPLICATIONS.   Lay out what this argument (#2 above) implies for understanding material culture, the improvement of society, relations between individuals, genders or groups (e.g., inter-ethnic, nations, etc.), who benefits, who gets hurt, or any other relevant  facet of social or cultural reality (a few sentences only). 

       

  3. Week 1 - Introduction: Anthropology, Architecture and Modernity 2 items
    1. Required Reading 2 items
      1. Architecture and the domestic sphere - Victor Buchli

        Chapter Essential Digitised reading.

      2. Editorial - Victor Buchli, Alison Clarke, Dell Upton 2004

        Article Essential

  4. Week 2 - The long 19th century 55 items
    This week will examine the historical currents in 18th and 19th and early 20th century thought and anthropological practise that have influenced the trajectories of anthropological analyses of architecture. Starting from the work of the the Abbé Laugier and his primitivist fantasies, Lewis Henry Morgan and later Walter Benjamin the week will pinpoint those themes that still frame (and obscure) debates in the present along with new advances in the social sciences in the post-war period where we see the beginnings of the ‘linguistic turn’ and the rise of structuralism.
    1. Required Reading: 4 items
      1. Positive and arbitrary - Joseph Rykwert

        Chapter Essential Digitised Reading

      2. Houses of Indian Tribes North of New Mexico - Lewis Henry Morgan, Paul Bohannan

        Chapter Essential Digitised reading.

      3. The Nature and Definition of the Field - Amos Rapoport

        Chapter Essential Digitised reading

      4. A Look at the Present - Amos Rapoport

        Chapter Essential We are unable to digitise more than one chapter. Please photocopy this reading.

    2. Further Reading: 51 items
      1. Travel engravings and the construction of the primitive - Steiner, C

        Chapter 

      2. The arcades project - Benjamin, Walter, Tiedemann, Rolf 2002

        Book Recommended Selected passages

      3. An essay on architecture - Laugier, Marc-Antoine, Hermann, Wolfgang 1977

        Book 

      4. Le Corbusier, the noble savage: toward an archaeology of modernism - Vogt, Adolf Max, Le Corbusier, Donnell, Radka c1998

        Book 

      5. The social contract; and, Discourses - Rousseau, Jean-Jacques, Cole, G. D. H., Brumfitt, J. H., Hall, John C. 1973

        Book 

      6. Ancient society - Morgan, Lewis Henry, Tooker, Elisabeth 1985

        Book 

      7. A Topology of Thresholds - Georges Teyssot 01/03/2005

        Article 

      8. Ten books on architecture - Vitruvius Pollio, Rowland, Ingrid D., Howe, Thomas Noble, Dewar, Michael 1999

        Book 

      9. Victorian anthropology - Stocking, George W. c1987

        Book 

      10. Les Rougon-Macquart: histoire naturelle et sociale d'une famille sous le second Empire - Zola, Émile, Mitterand, Henri, Lanoux, Armand c1960-c1967

        Book 

      11. Au bonheur des dames - Zola, Émile, Sctrick, Robert, Aziza, Claude 1998

        Book Recommended See below for English Language version

      12. The ladies' paradise - Émile Zola, Brian Nelson 1998

        Book Essential

      13. The fold: Leibniz and the Baroque - Deleuze, Gilles, Leibniz, Gottfried Wilhelm c1993

        Book 

      14. The Philosophy of Furniture - Edgar, Allen, Poe

        Chapter  Also available in other collections of Poe's writings; search the Library catalogue for more details

      15. The order of things: an archaeology of the human sciences - Foucault, Michel 2002

        Book 

      16. Native American architecture - Nabokov, Peter, Easton, Robert 1989

        Book 

      17. The material culture of the Crow Indians - Robert Harry Lowie 1922

        Article 

      18. A study of Pueblo architecture in Tusayan and Cibola - Mindeleff, Victor, Nabokov, Peter, Mindeleff, Cosmos 1989

        Book  8th Annual report of the Bureau of American Ethnology for the years 1886-1887

      19. Art, crafts and Paleolithic art - O. M. Abadia 01/02/2006

        Article 

      20. Space speak - Hall, Edward Twitchell

        Chapter 

      21. Reason in architecture - Henry, Glassie

        Chapter 

      22. Introduction - Paul Bohannan

        Chapter 

      23. Shelter in Africa - Oliver, Paul 1976

        Book 

      24. Shelter, sign and symbol - Oliver, Paul 1975

        Book 

      25. Dwellings: the house across the world - Oliver, Paul 1987

        Book 

      26. House form and culture - Rapoport, Amos c1969

        Book 

      27. The silent language - Hall, Edward Twitchell 1959

        Book 

      28. Frame analysis: an essay on the organization of experience - Goffman, Erving, Berger, Bennett M. 1986

        Book  1975 edition no longer available at UCL

      29. Language and mind - Chomsky, Noam 1972

        Book 

      30. Structuralism - Piaget, Jean, Maschler, Chaninah 1971

        Book 

      31. Course in general linguistics - Saussure, Ferdinand de, Bally, Charles, Riedlinger, Albert, Baskin, Wade 1974

        Book 

      32. A pattern language: towns, buildings, construction - Alexander, Christopher, Ishikawa, Sara, Silverstein, Murray 1977

        Book 

      33. After Tylor: British social anthropology, 1888-1951 - Stocking, George W. 1995

        Book 

      34. Famille et habitation - Chombart de Lauwe, P. 1959

        Book  Volume 1: Sciences humaines et conceptions de l'habitation

      35. Architecture without architects: a short introduction to non-pedigreed architecture - Rudofsky, Bernard, Museum of Modern Art (New York, N.Y.) 1964

        Book 

      36. The dogon of the French Sudan - Griaule, M. and G. Dieterlen

        Chapter 

      37. L'habitation des Fali - Jean Paul Lebeuf 1961

        Book  Not held at UCL : Held at the British Library

  5. Week 3 - Architecture and Archaeology 24 items
    Archaeology has traditionally been that sub-field of anthropology that has concerned itself most emphatically with the study of material culture and architecture in particular. Particularly within the area of ethno-archaeology emerging from the New Archaeology of the post-war period - the interface between people, material culture and architecture assumes a renewed methodological and theoretical significance for the study of society. This week will examine this tradition along with Post-Processual response to the New Archaeology and the similarities and differences of these approaches towards the study of architecture.
    1. Required Readings: 3 items
    2. Further Readings: 21 items
      1. Architecture and order: approaches to social space - Michael Parker Pearson, Colin Richards c1994

        Book Recommended

      2. The social logic of space - Hillier, Bill, Hanson, Julienne 1984

        Book 

      3. Housing culture: traditional architecture in English landscape - Johnson, Matthew 1993

        Book  A copy of this title is also available at the Bartlett Library NA7328 .J54 1993. Search the library catalogue for availability details.

      4. Matters material and ideal - Susan Kus

        Chapter Recommended UCL username and password required for off-site access. A print version of this title is also available below.

      5. Matters material and ideal - S, Kus

        Chapter Recommended

      6. The social archaeology of houses - Samson, Ross c1990

        Book 

      7. Beyond kinship: social and material reproduction in house societies - Joyce, Rosemary A. 2000

        Book 

      8. Three Rooms: Archaeology and Performance - Michael Shanks 01/06/2004

        Article 

      9. The Archaeology of Alienation: a late twentieth-century British Council Flat - Buchli, Victor, Lucas, Gavin

        Chapter 

      10. Material culture: current problems - V, Buchli

        Chapter 

      11. The perception of the environment: essays on livelihood, dwelling and skill - Ingold, Tim 2000

        Book 

      12. House Power: Swahili space and symbolic markers - L.W, Donley

        Chapter 

      13. Man, settlement and urbanism: proceedings of a meeting of the Research Seminar in Archaeology and Related Subjects held at the Institute of Archaeology, London University - Ucko, Peter J., Tringham, Ruth, Dimbleby, G. W., Research Seminar in Archaeology and Related Subjects 1972

        Book 

      14. Engendering archaeology: women and prehistory - Gero, Joan M., Conkey, Margaret Wright 1991

        Book 

  6. Week 4 - Social anthropology and the House Societies of Levi-Strauss 16 items
    In the wake of Levi-Strauss’ work, architecture begins to reassume a central significance in the understanding of human societies, notably in relation to his concept of ‘house societies’. This week will examine Levi-Strauss’ contribution and the way it has turned anthropological inquiry towards the architectural and the different responses and innovations that have resulted since.
    1. Required Readings: 3 items
      1. The social organization of the Kwakiutl - Claude Lévi-Strauss

        Chapter Essential Digitised Reading

      2. Inside a Mongolian tent - Caroline Humphrey Oct 31, 1974

        Article Essential

    2. Further Readings: 13 items
      1. Christian moderns: freedom and fetish in the mission encounter - Keane, Webb c2007

        Book 

      2. Do Dual Organizations Exist? - Claude, Lévi-Strauss

        Chapter Recommended UCL username and password required for off-site access.

      3. Structural anthropology - Claude Lévi-Strauss, Claire Jacobson, Brooke Grundfest Schoepf 1977

        Book Recommended

      4. After Kinship - Janet Carsten 2003

        Book Recommended UCL username and password required for off-site access. A print version of this title is also available below.

      5. After kinship - Janet Carsten 2004

        Book Recommended

      6. Claude Lévi-Strauss and the making of structural anthropology - Hénaff, Marcel 1998

        Book 

      7. Appendix: The Kabyle House or the world reversed - Pierre, Bourdieu

        Chapter Essential

      8. Tristes tropiques - Lévi-Strauss, Claude, Weightman, John, Weightman, Doreen 1992

        Book 

      9. At home: an anthropology of domestic space - Cieraad, Irene 1999

        Book 

      10. Theorizing the city: the new urban anthropology reader - Low, Setha M. c1999

        Book 

  7. Week 5 - Void potentials: absence, power and the production of urban space in London - Guest lecturer: Saffron Woodcraft 3 items
    Urban planning is a tool for spatialising power and producing citizen subjectivities. Taking east London’s Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park as a case, this lecture will explore how ‘community’ as political ideology and policy construct shapes urban planning and architecture. Based on ethnographic work with architects, planners and regeneration practitioners, the lecture will examine how the perceived failure of Britain’s post-war modernist housing estates is connected to a new ‘pro-social’ architectural form in the Olympic Park - the New London Vernacular. Focusing on the prominent role that ‘absences’ (empty space, absent communities, insufficient knowledge) are afforded in the Olympic Park’s planning process, the lecture will engage with the analytical potential of the ‘void’ to interrogate the production of power, space and citizen subjectivities in the neo-liberal city.
    1. Required reading 3 items
      1. The trouble with community - Vered Amit, Nigel Rapport

        Chapter Essential E-book

      2. Civilizing the Wastelands - Erik Harms

        Chapter Essential E-book

  8. Week 6 - reading week - no lectures 0 items
  9. Week 7 - Consumption studies and the home 24 items
    This week will discuss the rise of consumption studies in the built environment with particular emphasis on the home. The home is the context as well as the object of most consumer practices. The role of changing consumer practices and gender relations will be discussed, especially the impact of feminism and changing understandings of materiality in relation to the architecture of the home.
    1. Required Readings: 3 items
      1. Behind closed doors - Daniel Miller

        Chapter Essential Digitised Reading

      2. Homeyness - G. McCracken

        Chapter Essential Digitised Reading

    2. Further Readings: 21 items
      1. Hearth and home - Gullestad, M

        Chapter 

      2. The meaning of things: domestic symbols and the self - Csikszentmihalyi, Mihaly, Rochberg-Halton, Eugene c1981

        Book 

      3. Housing and identity: cross-cultural perspectives - Duncan, James S. c1981

        Book 

      4. Home possessions: material culture behind closed doors - Miller, Daniel 2001

        Book 

      5. Household choices - Newton, Charles, Putnam, Tim 1990

        Book 

      6. Sexuality & space - Colomina, Beatriz, Bloomer, Jennifer c1992

        Book 

      7. Stud: architectures of masculinity - Sanders, Joel c1996

        Book 

      8. Visions of suburbia - Silverstone, Roger 1997

        Book 

      9. Gendered spaces - Spain, Daphne c1992

        Book 

      10. The rituals of Christmas giving - James, Carrier

        Chapter  Also in Teaching Collection : SCIENCE 2100

      11. Modernism and the architecture of private life - Rosner, Victoria 2005

        Book 

  10. Week 8 - Iconoclasm, decay and the destruction of architectural forms 29 items
    The flip side of building is destruction - as one thing is built another is destroyed. This week will look at the significance of destructive practices, the decay of architectural forms, ruins, and the politics of preservation from the destruction of architectural forms in antiquity to the destruction of the World Trade Center in Manhattan.
    1. Required Readings: 3 items
      1. Saying good-bye - Neil Harris

        Chapter Essential Digitised Reading

      2. Introduction - Adrian Forty

        Chapter Essential Digitised Reading

    2. Further Readings: 26 items
      1. Requiem for the twin towers - Baudrillard, Jean

        Chapter 

      2. The archaeology of alienation: a late twentieth century British council house - Victor, Buchli & Gavin, Lucas

        Chapter 

      3. Non-places: introduction to an anthropology of supermodernity - Augé, Marc, Howe, John 1995

        Book 

      4. The architectural uncanny: essays in the modern unhomely - Vidler, Anthony c1992

        Book 

      5. Warped space: art, architecture, and anxiety in modern culture - Vidler, Anthony c2000

        Book 

      6. Ground zero - Virilio, Paul 2002

        Book 

      7. House - Whiteread, Rachel, Lingwood, James 1995

        Book 

      8. In the Shadow of Monuments: Notes on Iconoclasm and Time - M, Yampolsky. (Trans John, Kachur)

        Chapter 

      9. Present pasts: urban palimpsests and the politics of memory - Huyssen, Andreas c2003

        Book 

      10. The art of forgetting - Forty, Adrian, Küchler, Susanne 1999

        Book 

      11. Homo sacer: sovereign power and bare life - Agamben, Giorgio 1998

        Book 

      12. Spaces of Death and Memory - Hallam, Elizabeth, Hockey, Jennifer Lorna

        Chapter 

      13. The modern cult of monuments: its character and its origins - Alois Riegl 1982

        Article  Available at UCL in print only.

      14. Catastrophe & culture: the anthropology of disaster - Hoffman, Susannah M., Oliver-Smith, Anthony c2002

        Book 

      15. The architecture of deconstruction: Derrida's haunt - Wigley, Mark c1993

        Book 

      16. A thousand plateaus: capitalism and schizophrenia - Deleuze, Gilles, Guattari, Félix 2004, c1987

        Book 

      17. Industrial ruins: spaces, aesthetics, and materiality - Edensor, Tim 2005

        Book 

  11. Week 9 - Architecture and the Immaterial 3 items
    This week will consider the history of attempts to render architectural form immaterial. It will focus on how societies have attempted to mortify such forms, minimalise them, render them evanescent, or transcendent or entirely immaterial as in recent technologies associated with 3-D printing. In particular, the focus will be on how such attempts to dematerialise architectural form are part of larger order attempts to regulate power and secure the incorrigible terms of social life.
    1. Required readings 3 items
  12. Week 10 - Architecture and the Extra-terrestrial 3 items
    Until very recently the anthropological understanding of architectural forms has focused on terrestrial bound concepts assuming the presence of Earth’s gravity. This week will examine the trajectory of long held Modernist utopian ideals of transcending Earth’s gravity in the aid of various utopian projects and will explore new research into architectural forms in micro-gravity, with specific focus on the International Space Station, the oldest human habitation to escape Earth’s gravity as well as other proposed habitats for the Moon and Mars. Here the traditional anthropological understanding of the imbrication of body and built form takes on new and unexpected dimensions that challenge traditional understandings of the body, self hood and architectural form. The week will revisit post-colonial critiques of the ‘terra nullius’ and consider the new conditions of an ‘extra terram nullius’ as it relates to extra-terrestrial habitation.
    1. Required readings 3 items
      1. Relational Spaces: An Earthly Installation - Debbora Battaglia, David Valentine, Valerie Olson 25/05/2015

        Article Essential

      2. The worldhood of the world - M. Heidegger

        Chapter Essential Digitised reading.

  13. Week 11 - reading week - no lectures 0 items
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